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“With the launch of iOS 12, there are several new notification features such as new authorization options, dynamic quick actions, and user interaction within notifications. Learn more about how to implement these features and if they are right for your app.”


In 2016, Apple announced a new extension that will allow developers to better customize their push and local notifications called the UNNotificationContentExtension. The extension gets triggered when a user long presses or 3D touches on a notification whenever it is delivered to the phone or from the lock/home screen.

In the content extension, developers can use a view controller to structure the UI of their notification, but there was no user interaction enabled within the view controller — until now. With the release of iOS 12 and XCode 10, the view controller in the content extension now enables user interaction which means notifications will become even more powerful and customizable.

Stacked iOS 12 Notification Display

At WWDC 2018, Apple also announced several changes to notification settings and how they appear on the home screen. In an effort to make users more aware of how they are using apps and allowing more user control of their app usage, there is a new notification setting called “Deliver Quietly.” Users can set your app to Delivery Quietly from the Notification Center, which means they will not receive banners or sound notifications from your app, but they will appear in the Notification Center.

Apple using an in-house algorithm, which presumably tracks often you interact with notifications, will also ask users if they still want to receive notifications from particular apps and encourage you to turn on Deliver Quietly or turn them off completely.

Notifications are getting a big refresh in iOS 12, and I’ve only scratched the surface. In the rest of this article, we’ll go over the rest of the new notification features coming to iOS 12 and how you can implement them in your own app.

Remote vs Local Notifications

There are two ways to send push notifications to a device: remotely or locally. To send notifications remotely, you need a server that can send JSON payloads to Apple’s Push Notification Service. Along with a payload, you also need to send the device token and any other authentication certificate or tokens that verify your server is allowed to send the push notification through Apple. For this article, we focus on local notifications which do not need a separate server. Local notifications are requested and sent through the UNUserNotificationCenter. We’ll go over later how specifically to make the request for a local notification.

In order to send a notification, you first need to get permission from the user on whether or not they want you to send them notifications. With the release of iOS 12, there are a lot of changes to notification settings and permissions so let’s break it down. To test out any of the code yourself, make sure you have the Xcode 10 beta installed.

Notification Settings And Permissions

Delivery Quietly is Apple’s attempt to allow users more control over the noise they may receive from notifications. Instead of going into the settings app and looking for the app whose notification settings you want to change, you can now change the setting directly from the notification.

This means that a lot more users may turn off notifications for your app or just delivery them quietly which means the app will get badged and notifications only show up in the Notification Center. If your app has its own custom notification settings, Apple is allowing you to link directly to that screen from the settings management view pictured below.


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